Issue 26: Under the Radar

Robert Lees, SSW- Monsieur Perine:

Courtesy of Burger Records
Courtesy of Burger Records

The winners of a Latin American Grammy award for being the best artist of 2015, Monsieur Perine is still a relative unknown in the United States. Blending cumbia, native to their home country of Colombia, and American jazz, Perine has created a unique, upbeat sound that just makes you want to move with a smile on your face. I find it’s good for chores and long weekday commutes, as they have the type of sound that makes the time melt away to warm summer evenings, drink in hand. They have two albums, “Hecho a Mano” and “Caja de Musica,” which you should give a listen as soon as possible. Don’t worry if you don’t speak Spanish; great music has no set language.Check out this video of Monsieur Perine on NPR’s Tiny Desk:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGL-eQAAxGs

Myles Andrews-Duve, SSW- Cherry Glazerr:

Courtesy of Burger Records
Courtesy of Burger Records

If you were to somehow fit the band, Cherry Glazerr, into a box, the question wouldn’t be which box they belong in, but how long until they manage to kick their way out of it?

This is not to say that the sound of LA-based band — whose name is humorously inspired by NPR radio host, Cherry Glaser — is devoid of any relatable artists. Their lo-fi, garage rock aesthetic on songs like “Whites’ Not My Color This Evening” and “Haxel Princess” is reminiscent of Ty Segall or early-era Goo Goo Dolls. Yet, when coupled with lead singer Clementine Creevy’s dreamy falsetto, the band’s sound becomes the epitome of off-kilter.

Cherry Glazerr’s sound is not complex because it shouldn’t have to be, rather it is simply — and quite undeniably — good. There is beauty in this simplicity, the type that makes the success of your next garage band startup seem ever more palpable, one that (for better or worse) makes your shower singing seem an underappreciated art form.

Joseph Avila, SSW- Making Movies:

Courtesy of the Record Machine
Courtesy of the Record Machine

Making Movies is a four-piece band based out of Kansas City, Missouri with some of its members’ roots firmly planted in Panama and Mexico. Though they’re located in Kansas City, their music is much more than barbecue and baseball. They fuse indie rock sensibilities and Latin American sounds, often drifting between singing in English and Spanish and utilizing the percussive clacks of the traditional zapateado Mexican dance. The content of their music also finds itself caught between two worlds. Their latest EP, released in 2013 and appropriately titled, “A La Deriva” or “adrift,” contains lyrics about love lost, dealing with ego and, as mostly immigrants themselves, highlights the immigrant point of view with lyrics like, “Soy un perro callejero y salí pa la carretera. Yo fui buscando mi luz y mi bandera.” (“I’m a stray dog and I hit the road. I left looking for my light and my flag.”)

Adrian Garcia, CW- Mounties:

Courtesy of Light Organ Records
Courtesy of Light Organ Records

A little while ago, I came across an indie rock band called Mounties. They only had one album, “Thrash Rock Legacy,” and with any unfamiliar band I was initially skeptical of their sound. I was astounded with how unique and very different their songs sound from one another, from epic and unusual guitar solos to a variety of electronica elements used in a couple of other songs. The lead vocals also cycle between band members with certain songs which made them sound like a completely different band altogether. The first time I listened to “Thrash Rock Legacy” I thought I was listening to another band and I was amazed how the music is able to sound like many different genres in one album. Many of their songs are super radio-friendly and I’m shocked their music isn’t more popular.

Check out the music video for one of their singles, “Tokyo Summer”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAq1EUg15bk

 

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