Under the Radar: Haroula Rose, Snoh Aalegra and Injury Reserve

The Highlander appreciates artists in all forms, even those less renown. As such, in our “Under the Radar” series, we bring light to the underappreciated and incredibly talented. Enjoy.

Haroula Rose

Courtesy of Flickr
Courtesy of Flickr

If there is anything one can say about Haroula Rose’s music is that it’s intricately crafted. The Chicago-born, LA-based folk singer and guitarist weaves her music with calm and care that just doesn’t come through in many artists. Each note you hear from her delicate guitar playing sounds precise, not to mention how Rose’s vocals are also praiseworthy, embodying the indie folk music she produces. Her downtempo acoustic ballads exude a summery feel that is easy to relax to. Right now, Rose is in the midst of promoting her newly released album, “Here the Blue River.” The third track, “Moon and Waves” is one of my favorites because of how Rose makes it beautifully haunting. If you’re ever in the mood to unwind and just be at ease, then Haroula Rose is the way to go.  – Adrian Garcia, Contributing Writer

 

Injury Reserve – “Live From The Dentist’s Office”

Courtesy of YouTube
Courtesy of YouTube

Based out of Tempe, Ariz., Injury Reserve has slowly built a cult following with the release of their debut album, “Live From The Dentist’s Office.” The album, filled with downtempo jazzy breakbeats and completely unique flows, is reminiscent of artists like Earl Sweatshirt’s. Injury Reserve have so far been able to craft an incredibly unique sound. My favorite track, “Whatever Dude,” arguably their most popular song yet, has a beautiful beat, combining melodies and synth sounds along with trap-influenced percussion. The result is one of the best debut albums released in the last year. – Faraz Rizvi, RADAR Editor

 

Snoh Aalegra – “Don’t Explain – EP”

EP Cover Art
“Don’t Explain – EP” Cover Art

As music fans we have a tendency to typify and categorize an artist upon first listen. Here’s a tip before you listen to Snoh Aalegra: Don’t. Aalegra’s sensuous vocals and callous, bluesy delivery is sure to tempt the oft-used Amy Winehouse comparison or a “Hey, this reminds me of early Alicia Keys” remark, but this time around, let’s avoid that. The comparisons are not far off, sure, but as is displayed by her 2016 EP “Don’t Explain,” the Swedish-born Aalegra is has a distinct singularity both in sound and creative direction.

Offering a cover decorated as a vintage comic strip, “Don’t Explain” manages to encase the listener into a 1960s drama, as sultry violins and muffled percussion compliment a cinematic soul rarely explored in the contemporary genre. Yet it is Aalegra’s seductive vocals which reign most prominent and her lyricism traverses between motifs of apathy and compassion apt for the fickle, romantic subplot of the next James Bond film. – Myles Andrews-Duve, Editor-in-Chief

Stream Aalegra’s “Don’t Explain – EP” below:

 

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